Can you file a Rule 11 Motion After Judgment Is Entered?


Rule 11 contains a number of procedural requirements. You must serve the motion for sanctions 21 days before you file it to give the other party an opportunity to withdraw the pleading. One question that has received different answers is whether ot not you can file a motion for sanctions after final judgment is entered.

The case, Blue Heron Commercial Group, Inc. v. Lee Webber, 18-cv-467 (MD Florida June 20, 2019) holds that the motion for sanctions must be filed before final judgment is entered. It is noteworthy that the defendants obtained summary judgment against Blue Heron before they filed the sanctions motion.

As to the timeliness of a Rule 11 motion, the Eleventh Circuit has analyzed Rule 9011 of the Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure, which is “substantially identical” to Rule 11, and “agree[d] with the Second, Fourth, and Sixth Circuits that the service and filing of a motion for sanctions must occur prior to final judgment or judicial rejection of the offending motion.” In re Walker, 532 F.3d 1304, 1309 (11th Cir. 2008)(emphasis added)(quotation and citation omitted). The Eleventh Circuit in Walker thus affirmed the bankruptcy court’s denial of a motion for sanctions because the “motion for sanctions was filed after the offending motion had been denied.” Id.

Here, although it is undisputed that Defendants complied with Rule 11’s safe harbor provision, the Court finds that Defendants’ Motion for Sanctions is due to be denied because Defendants filed the motion after the Court granted summary judgment, entered final judgment, and disposed of Blue Heron’s alleged frivolous pleading. Id. Defendants, however, contend that Walker is inapplicable under the instant facts because, unlike this case, the movant in Walker sought sanctions prior to the conclusion of the 21-day safe harbor provision. The Court does not find that distinction to be determinative in this case because, although the court discussed the safe harbor provision in its analysis, the Eleventh Circuit in Walker did not ultimately base its ruling on the movant’s failure to satisfy the safe harbor provision. Walker, 532 F.3d at 1309. Rather, as discussed above, the court affirmed the bankruptcy court’s denial of sanctions because the “motion for sanctions was filed after the offending motion had been denied.” Id.

The Seventh Circuit follows a different rule, allowing a motion for sanctions to be filed after judgment.

The Blue Heron court also declined to award sanctions under its inherent powers on the ground that the arguments raised by Blue Heron were not frivolous.

The issue as to whether you must file a sanctions motion before judgment is entered is an unsettled question of law. The rules in one circuit may differ from the rules in another circuit. Someday the Supreme Court may resolve this conflict.

Ed Clinton, Jr.

http://www.clintonlaw.net

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