Rule 11 Motion Denied As Premature


The facts in D’Ottavio v. Slack Technologies, 18-cv-9082 (D. New Jersey April 15, 2019) are disputed. The plaintiff sued alleging that the Defendant’s website sent him unsolicited text messages. Defendant denied these allegations and filed a counterclaim which alleged that plaintiff deliberately caused the text messages to be sent to himself. Plaintiff denied the allegations in the counterclaim. Defendant then moved for Rule 11 sanctions arguing that the denials violated Rule 11 and were without factual basis.

Because no discovery had been taken and the facts were in dispute, the court denied the Rule 11 sanctions motion. The reasoingin:

Plaintiff’s counsel objects to Slack’s arguments. Counsel relates that on July 26, 2018, the parties participated in a Rule 16 initial conference before the Magistrate Judge, and at that conference, Slack’s counsel advised the Magistrate Judge that it wished to take a forensic examination of Plaintiff’s electronic devices to back up its claims that Plaintiff used these devices to repeatedly send himself text messages using Slack’s messaging platform. The Magistrate Judge then ordered the parties to confer as to a forensic examination protocol. The parties submitted a stipulation agreeing to the protocol which was then so-ordered by the magistrate judge on August 13, 2018. The Court then ordered that Slack was to conduct the forensic examination of Plaintiff’s computers and cell phones by no later than September 10, 2018. To date, however, counsel states that Slack has not taken a forensic examination of Plaintiff’s electronic devices.

Plaintiff’s counsel argues that Slack’s motion for sanctions must be denied because it lacks any proof that Plaintiff actually did what Slack says he did. Counsel argues that Slack is seeking sanctions against counsel and Plaintiff for filing an answer that has not been found to be false or frivolous. Counsel contends that Slack could have obtained the forensic examination it demanded, but instead when Plaintiff filed a denial to the counterclaims, Slack tried to bully Plaintiff into withdrawing his response by threatening him and his counsel with sanctions….

In support of its motion for sanctions, Slack takes the position that its proof as to Plaintiff’s conduct — and the conduct of Plaintiff’s counsel — is unrebutted and unrebuttable. The Court cannot credit Slack’s position at this stage in the case.

Slack has asserted counterclaims against Plaintiff alleging that Plaintiff fraudulently manufactured his TCPA claim by sending thousands of text messages to himself. Plaintiff has filed an answer to Slack’s counterclaims denying that allegation. Slack’s claims are pending, still in dispute, and they will proceed to discovery. Slack may view Plaintiff’s denials to be disingenuous and unsupported by the facts, but the procedural posture of the case precludes the Court from applying what is essentially a summary judgment standard to Slack’s motion for sanctions, which, if Slack’s position were credited, would ultimately result in a judgment in Slack’s favor prior to discovery.[5]

Consequently, the Court will deny without prejudice Slack’s motion for sanctions, reserving Slack’s right to reassert its motion at the appropriate time after discovery on its counterclaims.

In sum, the sanctions motion was premature. Should defendant prove that the answer to the counterclaim contained false denials, defendant can reassert the sanctions motion.

Edward X. Clinton, Jr.

 

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